May 05, 2017

Author: Christopher Cox

Category: Advocate

TED Talk from Pope Francis

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Perhaps you already have seen Pope Francis’ TED Talk “Why the only future worth building includes everyone.” If not, take a look. This post will be here when you have finished the 17 minutes, 52 second video.

Welcome back. Wasn’t that great?

In his direct, simple style, Pope Francis offers three main points (like his structure for most homilies):

  1. Pope Francis proposes a profoundly relational view of the world in contrast to a view that of “discarded people,” or as he has described on other occasions as a “throw away society” or the “globalization of indifference.”
  2. Pope Francis proposes that growth in science and technological innovation be coupled with a growth in equality and social inclusion. At the heart of this, he proposes solidarity as the way forward.
  3. Pope Francis proposes a “Revolution of tenderness.” ┬áThis tenderness in eyes, ear, hands, and heart is not weakness but fortitude. The Pope offers a shrewd understanding of power, not only of politicians and leaders of business, but also the power wielded by each of us.

Pope Francis offers an insightful way forward in such difficult times as this.

In a few minutes, I will leave this computer and walk to join in Milwaukee’s March for Workers. Locally, it has a particular concern for immigrant workers, but, personally, I will walk as well for exploited workers throughout the globe. In fact, most such marches today in the U.S. will likely use t-shirts for the cause made by other exploited workers.

Our work here at The Human Thread is a slow, gradual work. We share our tools and modules and scorecards. We talk with neighbors about our shopping habits. We support the work of those who meet with the leadership of retailers, urging human rights and a just wage in the dispersed corporate supply chain. This day, let us take some time to reflect on the “Revolution of Tenderness” proposed by Pope Francis, a revolution where indifference is replaced by compassion and solidarity, a revolution that sees not dollar signs but the faces of human beings, our very brothers and sisters.